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Red Feather Golf Club Membership Cost

red feather golf club membership cost
red feather golf club membership cost

The Red Feather Golf and Social Club is now promoting an opening in the summer of 2022. Its 18-hole golf course is being designed by King Collins Golf and amenities will include food-and-beverage venues, a resort-style pool with lazy river, spa services, private cabanas and pickleball. Owner Brad Ralston is drawing inspiration from Houston’s Bluejack National, where he is a national member, to create a similar laid-back vibe. While membership fees are three times that of 100-year-old Lubbock CC (where Ralston is a member), he’s confident “people are looking for high-end, but not stuffy.”

The new Red Feather Golf and Social Club in Lubbock, Texas is now promoting an opening in the summer of 2022, KKAM of Lubbock reported.

Brad Ralston is the owner of the club that will include an 18-hole golf course designed by Rob Collins of King Collins Golf of Chattanooga, Tenn. that will include two 600-yard holes, KKAM reported.

Red Feather is being built on a 135-acre property and the amenities offered for the social-club aspect will include food-and-beverage venues, a resort-style pool with lazy river, spa services, private cabanas and pickleball, KKAM reported.

A new location for a popular downtown Lubbock brewery and restaurant is also being planned as a separate venture near the Red Feather property in South Lubbock, KKAM reported, and is expected to draw further attention and appeal to that part of the city. About 200 homes will surround the new golf course on three sides.

Membership in Red Feather will be pricey, KKAM reported, citing these fees now listed on the club’s website:

  • Transferable Membership: $50,000 Initiation $750/Month
  • Callable Memberships: $30,000 Initiation $750/Month
  • Non-Resident (100 miles): $15,000 Initiation $500/Month
  • Social Only: $2,500 Initiation $500/Month Minimum Spend.

Those fees are about three times as much as what the 100-year-old Lubbock Country Club (where Ralston is a member) requires, KKAM noted.

In addition, ten memberships are being offered for a $250,000 buy-in but without dues or cart fees, and special lockers and priority for tournaments. Family members of those with this membership can then join for no buy-in, but must pay dues. Four of the ten have already been sold, Ralston told the Lubbock Lights website in September.

Ralston, the CEO of a local retail technology company, told Lubbock Lights that despite the private, high-end nature and expense of what is being built and created at Red Feather, it will be a place where “You can go out and hit balls on the driving range in swim trunks, t-shirt and flip-flops if you want. I think that’s probably where golf is headed—away from the stuffy type of club. I feel Lubbock’s ready for it.”

Ralston and his partners bought the land to use for residential development, but not all of the land was suitable for structures, Lubbock Lights reported.

“So we had 135 acres we needed to do something with and I saw an opportunity to say, ‘Why don’t we build a golf course here?’ So that’s what we did,” he said.

Lubbock CC is less than 20 miles from the Red Feather site, Lubbock Lights reported. That’s not a long drive, but as more people move further south by southwest in Lubbock and traffic increases, Ralston feels its location will be an attraction for Red Feather. “We definitely need a golf course on this side of town,” he said.

Ralston’s inspiration for Red Feather is Bluejack National near Houston (https://clubandresortbusiness.com/major-aspirations/), where he has a national membership, Lubbock Lights reported.

“It’s a Tiger Woods-designed course with a unique environment and vibe. It’s very laid back and I think that’s what probably pushed me over the edge of wanting to do [Red Feather],” he said. “I wouldn’t build a golf course that didn’t take this laid-back approach.”

The Red Feather course designed by King Collins will be “very playable,” Ralston told Lubbock Lights.

“I want to have immaculate conditions,” he said. “We’re going to have a ton of elevation change. It’s going to have barrancas that take the water when it rains where we want it to go, and will give the course a lot of character.”

For the course that will play from the tips right at 7,000 yards, with a par of 72, there will also be three massive double greens that will serve two holes and measure at about 35,000 sq ft. each, Lubbock Lights reported.

Ralston has brought in former pro golfer and teaching pro J.J. Killeen, who may run Red Feather on a day-to-day basis, Lubbock Lights reported. The first time Ralston met Killeen was when Killeen accidentally hit into Ralston’s group on the fourth hole at Lubbock Country Club several years ago; Ralston said he’d never seen someone hit it that far on number four.

Garrett Holt, whose resume includes work at Shady Oaks Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas, and TPC clubs in Scottsdale, Ariz. and San Antonio, Texas, will be the Course Superintendent, Lubbock Lights reported. Madi Irwin is on board as Director of Membership Experience.

The golf course has been targeted for an opening of 2023, to give its Innovation Zoysia and T-1 Bentgrass turf ample time for grow-in and to ensure enough seed could be secured as supplies have tightened, Lubbock Lights reported. But Ralston expects the driving range and short-game practice area to open in 2022 and said is already talking to a local high school about letting their varsity teams use the course.

Well before the club’s opening, Red Feather’s rooster logo is already making the rounds, Lubbock Lights reported, after Brady Shivers, a University of Houston golfer who attended high school near Lubbock, qualified for the U.S. Mid-Amateur in his Red Feather hat. “It really caught fire. We’re sending merchandise all over the country,” Ralston said.

Ralston and his partners have sold nearby land to the Lubbock Cooper Independent School District, where a second high school will be built with sports facilities, Lubbock Lights reported. And the Red Feather property is being designed so residents can take golf carts to the course or to nearby eateries. “I really want to build a live-in golf community,” he said.

At the club, Ralston told Lubbock Lights, he expects to play Texas country music during the day, then transition at 6:00 p.m. to a Vegas-style steakhouse beat. At mid-evening on weekends, the scene will be more like an upscale bar.

“You walk into larger country clubs and you see a grand piano in the dining room,” he said. “We’re going to have a DJ booth with two turntables. That’s the different vibe, but I don’t want to come off like it’ll be a raging party, it’ll just be a different vibe.

“We’ll have music in every room because no one talks in a quiet room,” he added. “It frees people up to speak.”

Where Lubbock Country Club has nearly 700 members, Ralston plans for Red Feather to have around 350, Lubbock Lights reported. “I really want to have more of a no-tee-time environment, where you just show up, hit some balls and go out when you’re ready,” he said.

“If we do it the way I want to, people will join,” Ralston added, saying that he has a list of 200 people who’ve said they’re interested. “I honestly feel I have 100 memberships I’m very confident will sign up.

“Lubbock is booming. I see no end in sight for the health of our economy,” he said. “There’s a lot of national business located out of Lubbock. Our company services grocery stores across the United States, and we’re headquartered here.”

“The income is there, obviously and I think people are looking for high-end, but not stuffy,” he added. “I think people will embrace a more casual club,” he said.